Asian-African Conference, Bandung, Indonesia, April 1955.
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Asian-African Conference, Bandung, Indonesia, April 1955. by George McTurnan Kahin

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Published by Cornell University Press in Ithaca, N.Y .
Written in English


Book details:

Classifications
LC ClassificationsDS35 A8 1955C
The Physical Object
Pagination88p.
Number of Pages88
ID Numbers
Open LibraryOL14665111M

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Asian-African Conference. Selected Documents of the Bandung Conference; Texts of Selected Speeches and Final Communique of the Asian-African Conference, Bandung, Indonesia, April , New York: Distributed by the Institute of Pacific Relations, Bandung Conference, a meeting of Asian and African states—organized by Indonesia, Myanmar (Burma), Ceylon (Sri Lanka), India, and Pakistan—which took place April 18–24, , in Bandung, Indonesia. In all, 29 countries representing more than half the world’s population sent delegates. The. Bandung: An on-the-spot description of the Asian-African Conference, Bandung, Indonesia, April, by Jack, Homer Alexander. and a great selection of related . Aug 08,  · In the article below independent historian Kyle Haddad-Fonda describes the Asian-African Conference popularly known as the Bandung Conference which was the first significant gathering of independent and soon-to-be independent nations in Asia and Africa. From April 18 to April 24, , delegates from twenty-nine countries Read MoreThe Asian-African (Bandung) Conference: Fact .

[1] Asian-African Conference, Recreation Section announcement (17 April ). 1 leaf --[2] Crisis of France in North Africa: from the New statesman and nation, London, of April 16th, 3 leaves --[3] Address by His Excellency Dr. Ali Sastroamidjojo, Prime Minister of Indonesia, president of the Asian-African-Conference. 14 leaves --[4. Bandung Conference (Asian-African Conference), In April, , representatives from twenty-nine governments of Asian and African nations gathered in Bandung, Indonesia to discuss peace and the role of the Third World in the Cold War, economic development, and decolonization. African-American author Richard Wright's book The Color Curtain: A Report on the Bandung Conference (Cleveland and New York: World, ) is based on his impressions and analysis of the postcolonial Asian-African Conference, which was a gathering of representatives from 29 independent Asian and African countries, held in the city of Bandung, Indonesia, April 18–24, The first large-scale Asian–African or Afro–Asian Conference—also known as the Bandung Conference (Indonesian: Konferensi Asia-Afrika)—was a meeting of Asian and African states, most of which were newly independent, which took place on 18–24 April in Bandung, Indonesia. The twenty-nine countries that participated represented a total population of billion people, 54% of the.

Get print book. No eBook available. notes, across web, tablet, and phone. Go to Google Play Now» Bandung: An On-the-spot Description of the Asian-African Conference, Bandung, Indonesia, April, Homer Alexander Jack. Toward Freedom, An On-the-spot Description of the Asian-African Conference, Bandung, Indonesia, April, [5] Opening statement of the honorable Carlos P. Romulo, member of the cabinet, chairman of the Philippine Delegation to the Asian-African Conference, Bandung, Indonesia. 17 leaves [6] Delegation of Libya, Asian African Conference, Bandung (18 April ). 3 leaves. The Asian-African Conference, Bandung, Indonesia, April [George McTurnan Kahin] on imeldaclyde.com *FREE* shipping on qualifying offers. The Asian-African Conference convened in Bandung, Indonesia, April 17–24, , bringing together representatives from 29 newly independent nations, which had either been formally colonized or subjected to unequal treaties by European nations.